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Formal Formulations

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Formal Technical References

Internet Utilities: [ Archie ] [ Finger ] [ Ping ] [ Traceroute ] [ Whois ]
Formal Methods: [ Collected Links ] [ NASA Langley ] [ Virtual Library ]
Formal Languages: [ Backus Naur Form ] [ Programming Languages ] [ Evolving Algebras ]
Specific Topics: [ Apple ] [ ATM ] [ C ] [ CGI ] [ Graphics Archives ] [ Java ] [ HP ]
[ HTML Specs ] [ HTML Tools ] [ Image Processing ] [ LISP ] [ Netscape ]
[ PERL ] [ Servers ] [ UNIX ] [ Visual Basic ] [ Web Tools ] [ Windows 95 ]
Other Collections: [ Technical Bookmarks ]

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Apple MacIntosh Platforms

Apple Providers MacWeek http://www.austin.apple.com/
Applescript atEgoWeB PowerPak Tutorials
Eric Iverson's AppleScript QuickTime Virtual Reality MacHTTP Page
Jeff's Macintosh Perl with MacHTTP

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ATM - Asychronous Transmission Mode

Brief Tutorial
Navy NetLab CISCO Internetworking Related Info Page

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C Language

SGI C Requirements

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CGI - Common Gateway Interface

Specifications

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Graphics and Icon Archives

n-vision/panda
infomart/clipart
jhudson/clipart
clever.net/clip_art
Graphics for HTML
Realm Graphics
Spider Web's Imagebase
Anthony's Icons
Icons and Images
Daniel's Icons
Yahoo's Icons
Rutgers Icons
Formal Backgrounds
Texture Land!
Fancy Lines
Lines
CSC Image Page
WWW Image Server

Transparent Backgrounds Color Flatbed Scanners
Transparent GIFs: netpbm utilities
Making Transparent GIFs
Simply Scanning
Snappy To Grab Images

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HP

HP3000

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HTML Specifications

IETF - RFC 1866     Popular Reference     Sandia National Labs
Working Group Pages WWW HTML Home Page HTML Reference Manual
Official HTML 2.0 HTML Version 2.0 HTML Elements
Proposed extensions

Actual HTML Extensions
Netscape Version 1.0 Netscape Version 2.0 (A)
Microsoft Version 2.0
Netscape Version 1.1 Netscape Version 2.0 (B) HTML Java 1.0

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HTML Tools

HTML Writers Guild Website
Imagemaps
New HTML
JumpStation
Beginner's Guide
Hagan's World
Beginner's HTML
tr-www.html
HTML Links at CIW
Web Developer's Virtual Library
Tools and Procedures
Wade's Tutorials
Wishing Well HTML
Wacky HTML
Q&D Development

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Image Processing

Image Processing

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LISP

LISP History

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Netscape

Creating Net Sites Navigator Software Netscape People
DownLoad Netscape 1.1 Netscape Handbook Welcome to Netscape
Extensions to HTML Netscape Navigator 1.1

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PERL

PERL UF/NA Perl Archive Usage Statistics

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Server Software

Servers Chart Apache HTTPd NCSA HTTPd
NetSite HTTPd WN Servers: User's Guide

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UNIX

MPE/iX vs. UNIX

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Visual Basic

Visual Basic

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Web Tools

Counter - Webtools.org
Counter - Forsmark
Counter - ssd
Counter - USAor.net
Counter - Digits.com
DigiCash eCash
URL-Minder
Electronic Security
Web Tools Review home
Webmasters' Guild
Guestbook Software
Weblint on HTML
Residential ISDN
Browser-Aware Page
tucows Winsock Software

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Windows 95

NetBack's Win95 Client Software
Stroud's Win95 Applications List
Win95 Home Page Windows95 Home Page

Here are the equations for the genesis of Windows 95:

Windows 95      = Windows 3.1
                + Hewlett-Packard NewWave
                + Morphing Multi-Media ( MMM )
                + World Wide Web ( WWW );

Windows 3.1     = Apple MacIntosh
                + Larger Screens
                + Millions of Colors;

Apple MacIntosh = Hewlett-Packard
                + Palo Alto 
                + Laws of Form;

Hewlett-Packard = SPL
                + Hardware Instruments
                + Garage Electronics

SPL             = ALGOL from Burroughs ( UniSys );
                + Burroughs Business Banking
                + ALGOL-60, a formal document.

From a formal perspective, this represents the culmination of a series of generalizations to allow:
"An Exchange of Arithmetic Expressions between two Objects",

The Form and Substance of Windows 95 conforms to the Formal Form for the conceptual Substance of Arithmetic Expressions as formulated in ALGOL-60. Gates tried to break the Formal Form with his atrocious implementation of OLE, but the Form prevailed via HP's NewWave.

Windows 95

Regarding the above equations, Bob Staudenmaier wrote:

>Your metaphor of Windows 95 = Win 3.1 + HP NewWave is interesting.  
>However, I am currently trying to find a way to export my NewWave 
>objects to Windows 95 objects, 
            ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Response: Fascinating! Having developed a WorkFlow system for the NewWave Desktop, complete with embedded Agent Scripts that would determine the behavior of the software applications that constituted the Work for a node on the network. I've wondered how far NewWave actually penetrated the market before HP pulled the plug and OLE took root.
>so I guess it isn't a completely good comparison!  ;-)
Response: Ah, hmmmmm true enough, but Objects is Objects. The real question is how the "methods" of an object are expressed, and the form of that expression. The substance of any method is the specific analytical algorithm that implements the substantive function of the method. OLE verses OMF is a classic example of the top-down verses botton-up software methodologies - adding functional source code as cases in a 'switch' statement of a program module with global memory, verses instantiating skelton procedures which access formal parameters and a limited number of global references. Less elegance but more control.

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Copyright 1995. Formal Formulations. ~ ~ ~ Send e-Mail to cv_rm_1.html.
Updated 96/01/25 .